Mini Macramé Planters

Sometimes your brain just needs a fun break. If your brain is getting tangled at the thought of all these knots, don’t worry. These mini macramé planters are relaxing to make and even more relaxing to look at. 

If you have one of our macramé kits, you’re all set to make one planter. 

For folks starting from scratch, you need these materials for each project:
— 1.5 inch terra cotta pot *
— 8 pieces of 1mm-ish cord cut to 48 inches long *
— office tape
— scissors
— a ruler


* You can adjust these directions to use any size of pot and cord, but it will take some math and experimenting to get the length right. For instance, the square knot chain was scaled down from directions on Lowe’s website.

 

VIDEO
TUTORIAL

Overhand Net

DIFFICULTY: easy beginner
TECHNIQUE: overhand knot

 

VIDEO
TUTORIAL

Square Knot Chain

DIFFICULTY: moderate beginner
TECHNIQUES: overhand, square knot

WRITTEN
DIRECTIONS

Overhand Net is the easiest macramé pattern. There’s only one knot to use, so the project goes very quickly.

WRITTEN
DIRECTIONS

Square Knot Chain looks more complicated than it is. Once you find your groove, this project is soothing.

Step 1: Line up all eight cords and fold them in half together.

Step 2: Near the fold, tie an overhand knot with the entire bunch. The fold should form a small loop so you can hang the planter. Be sure the knot is snug. Tape the loop to a table to make things easier.

Step 3: Time to make the net! You may want to tape the hanging loop to a table to make things easier.

Row 1:

1:1 Take four strands and tie them together in an overhand knot. Get this knot as close to the first big knot as possible.

1:2 Repeat with each group of four strands so that you have four knots just under the big knot. We'll call these knots A, B, C, and D.

Row 2:

2:1 Take two strands from Knot A and two strands from the next knot to the right, Knot B. Join these strands with a new overhand knot about three inches below Row 1. We’ll call this Knot E.

2:2 Rotate your work a bit to the right. Take the two leftover strands from Knot B and two new strands from Knot C (to the right), and make an overhand knot three inches below Row 1. This is Knot F.

2:3 Take the two leftover strands from Knot C and two new strands from Knot D (to the right), and make another overhand knot three inches below Row 1. This is Knot G.

2:4 Now you should be back around to the beginning. Take the last two strands from Knot D and the last two strands from Knot A and make an overhand knot three inches below Row 1. This is Knot H.

Row 3:

3:1 Take two strands from Knot E and two strands from Knot F (to the right). Join these strands with an overhand knot one inch below Row 2. This is Knot M.

3:2 Rotate your work to the right. Take the two leftover strands from Knot F and two new strands from Knot G (to the right). Join these strands with an overhand knot one inch below Row 2. This is Knot N.

3:3 Take the two leftover strands from Knot G and two new strands from Knot H (to the right). Join these strands with an overhand knot one inch below Row 2. This is Knot O.

3:4 Again, you should be back around to the beginning. Take the last two strands from Knot H and the last two strands from Knot E and make one more overhand knot one inch below Row 2. This is Knot P.

Row 4:

4:1 Take two strands from Knot M and two strands from Knot N (to the right). Join these strands with an overhand knot one inch below Row 3. This is Knot Q.

4:2 Rotate your work to the right. Take the two leftover strands from Knot N and two new strands from Knot O (to the right). Join these strands with an overhand knot one inch below Row 3. This is Knot R.

4:3 Take the two leftover strands from Knot O and two new strands from Knot P (to the right). Join these strands with an overhand knot one inch below Row 3. This is Knot S.

4:4 Again, you should be back around to the beginning. Take the last two strands from Knot P and the last two strands from Knot M and make one more overhand knot one inch below Row 3. This is Knot T.

Row 5:

5:1 This set of knots will make a sturdy pocket for the pot to sit in. Take two strands from Knot Q and two strands from Knot R (to the right). Make an overhand knot as close as possible to Row 4. This is Knot U.

5:2 Rotate your work to the right. Take the two leftover strands from Knot R and two new strands from Knot S (to the right). Make an overhand knot as close as possible to Row 4. This is Knot V.

5:3 Take the two leftover strands from Knot S and two new strands from Knot T (to the right). Make an overhand knot as close as possible to Row 4. This is Knot W.

5:4 Again, you should be back around to the beginning. Take the last two strands from Knot T and the last two strands from Knot Q and make one more overhand knot as close as possible to Row 4. This is Knot X.

Your net is complete!

Step 4: Find the longest strand hanging down from Row 5. (There’s always one…) Wrap it around all of the strands 2-3 times, pass the end of that strand under the wraps, and pull it as snug as possible just below Row 5. Trim the ends until the tassel looks nice.

Step 5: If you want to, paint some designs on your tiny pot. Acrylic paint sticks best to terra cotta. Cotton swabs are good for making big dots. A bamboo skewer makes small dots with the blunt end, and fine lines with the point. Have fun!

Step 6: If you like tending plants, feel free to give one a new home in your tiny pot. Otherwise, once the paint is dry, tuck the pot into the macramé holder and hang it up.

Step 1: Line up four cords and fold them in half together.

Step 2: Near the fold, tie an overhand knot with the entire bunch. The fold should form a small loop so you can hang the planter. Be sure the knot is snug. Tape the loop to a table to make things easier.​

Step 3: Separate the strands into four groups of two strands each. Tape one group of two to the table near the ends.

Step 4: Take one of the extra cords, find the middle, and tie a knot around two taped strands. Scoot this knot until it is two inches below the hanging knot. This is your working cord. The taped center strands won't move.

Step 5: Make a square knot chain. Now, this technique has a lot of “left” and “right” going on, so let’s name the ends of our working cord “Bonnie” and “Clyde” for simplicity.

The Knot:

5:1 Bonnie starts to the left of the center strands, and Clyde is on the right.

5:2 Cross Clyde over the center strands, from right to left, and leave him at a down angle.

5:3 Cross Bonnie over Clyde from left to right, then continue under the center strands, then angle up through the space between the center strands and Clyde. Pull the knot tight.

5:4 Now Clyde is on the left, and Bonnie is on the right.

5:5 Time to go back the other way. Cross Clyde over the center strands, from left to right, and leave him at a down angle.

5:6 Cross Bonnie over Clyde from right to left, then continue under the center strands, then angle up through the space between the center strands and Clyde. Pull the knot tight.

The Chain:

Repeat this process four more times so that you have a chain of 5 square knots. Bonnie makes a loop on the outside of each knot, so just check that you have 5 bumps to the left and 5 to the right.

Step 6: Let’s call the results of Step 5 “Chain A.” Repeat Steps 4-5 on the two strands to the right of Chain A to make Chain B.

Step 7: Repeat Steps 4-5 on the two strands to the right of Chain B. This is Chain C.

Step 8: Repeat Steps 4-5 on the two strands to the right of Chain C to make Chain D. Now you should have four square knot chains.

Step 9: Make a second set of chains. This part looks a little weird at first, but I promise it gets easier.

The Setup:

9:1 Take the far-right strand from the bottom of Chain A and the far-left strand of Chain B and bring them together. These are your new center strands.

9:2 Move down 2 inches. Take one center strand from Chain A to be your new Bonnie. Take one center strand from Chain B to be your new Clyde.

9:3 Repeat Step 5 to make Chain E.

Keep Going:

9:4 Rotate your work to the right. Combine the unused strands from Chain B with two new strands from Chain C. This is Chain F.

9:5 Repeat that process using Chain C and Chain D. This is Chain G.

9:6 Now you should be back around to the beginning. Use the remaining strands of Chain D and Chain A to make Chain H.

Step 10: Take four strands at the bottom of Chain E and tie them together in an overhand knot, about half an inch below the chain. Call this Knot E.

Step 11: Repeat Step 10 three times to make Knot F, Knot G, and Knot H.

Step 12: Make the base of the net.

12:1 Take two strands from Knot E and two strands from Knot F. Join them with another overhead knot directly below the parent knots (this is Knot W).

12:2 Rotate your work to the right. Take two strands from Knot F and two strands from Knot G. Join them with another overhead knot directly below the parent knots (this is Knot X).

12:3 Take two strands from Knot G and two strands from Knot H. Join them with another overhead knot directly below the parent knots (this is Knot Y).

12:4 Now you should be back around to the beginning. Use remaining strands Knot H and Knot E to make Knot Z.

Your net is complete!

Macrame Instructions

Step 13: Find the longest strand hanging down from Row 5. (There’s always one…) Wrap it around all of the strands 2-3 times, pass the end of that strand under the wraps, and pull it as snug as possible just below the knots. Trim the ends until the tassel looks nice.

Step 14: If you want to, paint some designs on your tiny pot. Acrylic paint sticks best to terra cotta. Cotton swabs are good for making big dots. A bamboo skewer makes small dots with the blunt end, and fine lines with the point. Have fun!

Step 15: If you like tending plants, feel free to give one a new home in your tiny pot. Otherwise, once the paint is dry, tuck the pot into the macramé holder and hang it up.